Marbled Rye Sourdough Bread, THM E, DF, SF

Have you ever had a deli sandwich with marbled rye bread? You can easily make this recipe at home and adding dark rye flour and caraway seeds give this loaf a very distinctive flavor.

Rye flour is lower in gluten so that is the reason that I add wheat flour and vital wheat gluten to this dough. These both help to get a better rise and more tender crumb.

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If you have been following my blog you will know that I love to bake with sourdough. Fermenting the dough makes it easier for your body to digest. Some people who are sensitive to gluten can eat sourdough bread since it has been fermented which breaks the phytic acids down. To me, there is something special about taking flour and water and turning it into a bubbling starter.

Sourdough bread is made by fermenting the dough naturally using occurring lactobacilli and wild yeast for a number of hours. Sourdough was the usual form of leavening bread down through the Middle Ages until it was replaced by other products. French Bakers brought sourdough techniques to California during the Gold Rush where it remains part of the culture today.

My starter, pictured below, is over 9 years old. From this jar, I have sent our thousands of jars/packs of starter to help others begin their journey into this intriguing world of baking. If you would like to purchase a mature starter to give you a jumpstart into baking you can purchase one on the “Buy it Now” page.

A bit of white flour is allowed in a loaf of bread. The bread will still be THM approved as an E. I choose to use King Arthur Bread Flour in my starter. This white flour will be fermented for 20+ hours until I bake the bread. That is why I choose to use it in the starter. In the dough I use all whole grain rye and white wheat flour.

I receive many questions about why I use vital wheat gluten. Here is the reason I add vital wheat gluten—whole grain flour is much harder to develop the gluten that is what you get dense solid loaves. Gluten is the structure that traps gases cause the loaf to rise. By adding vital wheat gluten you will have adequate gluten to trap the gases cause your loaves to rise much better.

Whole grain flour takes longer to absorb moisture than white flour. That makes it so easy to get your bread dough too stiff. If your bread dough seems stiff — every time you do a set of stretch and folds, dip your hands in water. This added moisture will help to loosen the dough.

This article Understanding Sourdough Bread explains what flours can be used and why they are used in on-plan sourdough bread. 

3 breads 25

You can make your own starter by following the instructions on this blog post Making a Sourdough Starter. You can even buy a Sourdough Beginner Kit that will have a mature starter, flours, vital wheat gluten, and an Around the Family Table Cookbook included.

This Sourdough Beginner’s Kit has everything you need to start on your sourdough journey.

I know….my swirl didn’t get quite right but this bread sure taste so good. I can’t wait to make a Reuben Sandwich with this bread.

Marbled Rye Sourdough Bread, THM E, DF, SF

  • Dark Rye:
  • 3/4 cup active sourdough starter
  • 3/4 cup room temperature black coffee
  • 1 cups dark rye or pumpernickel flour
  • 1/2 cup White Whole Wheat Flour
  • 1 teaspoons ground caraway seeds
  • 2 tablespoons  vital wheat gluten
  • 1 tablespoon cocoa
  • 1/2 teaspoon blackstrap molasses
  • 1 teaspoons salt
  • Light Rye:
  • 3/4 cup active sourdough starter
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1/2 cup rye flour
  • 1 cups white whole wheat flour
  • 2 tablespoons vital wheat gluten
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Dark Rye: In a large mixing bowl, stir starter, coffee, flours, caraway seeds, wheat gluten, cocoa, and molasses together until combined. You will have a rough, sticky dough. Allow the dough to rest 20 minutes. Add Salt. Mix well. Rye flour makes a very sticky dough. Cover and allow it to rise for 1 hour. Light Rye: In a large mixing bowl, stir starter, water, flours, and, wheat gluten together until combined. You will have a rough, sticky dough. Allow the dough to rest 20 minutes. Add Salt. Mix well. Rye flour makes a very sticky dough. Cover and allow it to rise for 1 hour. Stretch and Folds: Remove lid. Dip your hands in water and gently pick up one side of the dough, fold it in half. Repeat with all four sides of dough. Cover and allow to rise for another hour. Repeat 2 more times for a total of 4 folding times. Allow to ferment for 5 1/2 hours at room temperature from the time you mix it until you put the dough in the fridge. Refrigerating ferment: Allow the dough to ferment for a total of 4 hours at room temperature from the time you mix it until you put the dough in the fridge. Cover and place in the refrigerator for 12 hours or longer. Remove dough from the refrigerator. Shape following the directions below. Room temperature ferment: Allow the dough to ferment at room temperature for a total of 7 hours from the time you mix it until you shape it to be baked. Shaping the dough: Sprinkle counter heavily with sprouted rye flour or brown rice flour. Dump light rye dough on counter. Pat dough out until it is 1/2 inch thick. Lay dark rye dough on top and pat out. Roll bread dough up into a log, tucking edges under. Lay on parchment paper. Baking in a hot baker: shape the loaf and allow it to be at room temperature while oven preheats. Place baker/lid in oven on the bottom rack and turn oven to 450 degree F. When oven is at correct temperature. Slash the loaf. Place loaf into the baker carefully by holding the sides of the parchment paper. Place lid on the Baker. Set the timer for 35 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 400 degrees. Remove the lid and bake for an additional 12-13 minutes. Remove clay baker from oven. Remove loaf to a wire rack to cool. Baking in a cold baker: Line the bottom of the clay baker with parchment paper or foil. Place loaf seam side down in a clay baker. Cover. Allow loaf to warm to room temperature for 15 minutes. Remove the lid from the baker and fill with water. Allow the water to soak the lid for 10 minutes. Slash the loaf with a sharp knife. Empty the water from the lid and place it on the clay baker. Place the covered baker into the hot oven. Set the timer for 35 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 400 degrees. Remove the lid and bake for an additional 12-13 minutes. Remove clay baker from oven. Remove loaf to a wire rack to cool. 12-14 slices.
  • To be plan approved for THM sourdough items made with sourdough starter needs a 7 hours room temp ferment OR 24 hour fridge ferment. You can combine room and fridge temp, also. 1 hour room temp equals 3.5 hours in the fridge.
  • THE 7 HOUR FERMENTING TIME IS COUNTED FROM THE TIME YOU MIX THE DOUGH UNTIL YOU BAKE IT.

Here is the dough being layered together. You can see the distinctive colors of the two doughs.

Here are the two doughs pressed together. I wet my hands when I pressed the dough flat to help them stick together.

Here is the loaf slashed and ready to be baked. You can see the different colors of dough through the cuts.

Here is a helpful tip when doing stretch and folds. Dip your hands in water before touching the dough. The water on your hands will prevent the dough from sticking.

If you have questions about feeding your starter, watch this video. It may help you understand how the starter should look after it is fed.

Amazon

King Arthur Flour, Og, White Whl Wheat, NET WT 5 LBS (2.27 kg)

King Arthur Flour is a very, very good flour to use when baking sourdough bread. It is never bleached or bromated. Most Walmarts or large supermarkets carry it on their shelves. It can also be purchased from Amazon.

I use a Danish Dough Whisk when I want to mix bread and not use my mixer.
Glasslock Mixing Bowl, 6.25-Quart
I love to use glass bowls for my sourdough. I can walk past and see at a glance how much my dough has risen.

Marbled Rye Sourdough Bread, THM E, DF, SF

Course Side Dish
Cuisine American
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Servings 16 slices
Author Glenda Groff

Ingredients

  • Dark Rye:
  • 3/4 cup active sourdough starter
  • 3/4 cup room temperature black coffee
  • 1 cups dark rye or pumpernickel flour
  • 1/2 cup White Whole Wheat Flour
  • 1 teaspoons ground caraway seeds
  • 2 tablespoons vital wheat gluten
  • 1 tablespoon cocoa
  • 1/2 teaspoon blackstrap molasses
  • 1 teaspoons salt
  • Light Rye:
  • 3/4 cup active sourdough starter
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1/2 cup rye flour
  • 1 cups white whole wheat flour
  • 2 tablespoons vital wheat gluten
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Instructions

  1. Dark Rye: In a large mixing bowl, stir starter, coffee, flours, caraway seeds, wheat gluten, cocoa, and molasses together until combined. You will have a rough, sticky dough. Allow the dough to rest 20 minutes. Add Salt. Mix well. Rye flour makes a very sticky dough. Cover and allow it to rise for 1 hour. Light Rye: In a large mixing bowl, stir starter, water, flours, and, wheat gluten together until combined. You will have a rough, sticky dough. Allow the dough to rest 20 minutes. Add Salt. Mix well. Rye flour makes a very sticky dough. Cover and allow it to rise for 1 hour. Stretch and Folds: Remove lid. Dip your hands in water and gently pick up one side of the dough, fold it in half. Repeat with all four sides of dough. Cover and allow to rise for another hour. Repeat 2 more times for a total of 4 folding times. Allow to ferment for 5 1/2 hours at room temperature from the time you mix it until you put the dough in the fridge. Refrigerating ferment: Allow the dough to ferment for a total of 4 hours at room temperature from the time you mix it until you put the dough in the fridge. Cover and place in the refrigerator for 12 hours or longer. Remove dough from the refrigerator. Shape following the directions below. Room temperature ferment: Allow the dough to ferment at room temperature for a total of 7 hours from the time you mix it until you shape it to be baked. Shaping the dough: Sprinkle counter heavily with sprouted rye flour or brown rice flour. Dump light rye dough on counter. Pat dough out until it is 1/2 inch thick. Lay dark rye dough on top and pat out. Roll bread dough up into a log, tucking edges under. Lay on parchment paper. Baking in a hot baker: shape the loaf and allow it to be at room temperature while oven preheats. Place baker/lid in oven on the bottom rack and turn oven to 450 degree F. When oven is at correct temperature. Slash the loaf. Place loaf into the baker carefully by holding the sides of the parchment paper. Place lid on the Baker. Set the timer for 35 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 400 degrees. Remove the lid and bake for an additional 12-13 minutes. Remove clay baker from oven. Remove loaf to a wire rack to cool. Baking in a cold baker: Line the bottom of the clay baker with parchment paper or foil. Place loaf seam side down in a clay baker. Cover. Allow loaf to warm to room temperature for 15 minutes. Remove the lid from the baker and fill with water. Allow the water to soak the lid for 10 minutes. Slash the loaf with a sharp knife. Empty the water from the lid and place it on the clay baker. Place the covered baker into the hot oven. Set the timer for 35 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 400 degrees. Remove the lid and bake for an additional 12-13 minutes. Remove clay baker from oven. Remove loaf to a wire rack to cool. 12-14 slices.
  2. To be plan approved for THM sourdough items made with sourdough starter needs a 7 hours room temp ferment OR 24 hour fridge ferment. You can combine room and fridge temp, also. 1 hour room temp equals 3.5 hours in the fridge.

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