Sourdough English Muffins THM-E

Make your own Sourdough English Muffins–why of course you can! These Sourdough English Muffins are stirred together with a large spatula using white whole wheat The dough is then allowed to ferment for seven hours at room temperature. English Muffins are dry fried in a skillet over medium-low heat until they are totally cooked through. This dry frying gives them a crisp crust with a moist chewy center that English Muffins are known for. My family just loves them. You can make your own sourdough starter or you can request a small jar by emailing me . I do ask that you cover the cost of packing/shipping.

What is white whole wheat flour you may ask? White whole wheat flour is 100% whole grain flour. It is made from hard white spring wheat. Regular whole wheat flour is made from hard red winter wheat. These both are 100% whole grain but with be different in color, density, and taste. White whole wheat flour will give your bread a much lighter color and will not have as strong of a taste as regular whole wheat. Either one can be used in this recipe. My family prefers the white whole wheat over regular whole wheat.

Sourdough English Muffins THM-E

  • 1 1/2 cups sourdough starter
  • 2 cups water
  • 3 1/2 cups white whole wheat flour**
  • 1 Tablespoon Honey
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons mineral salt
  • 2 ½ teaspoons baking soda
  • Mix together starter, water, whole wheat flour, and honey. Set on countertop to ferment 7 hours or overnight. When you are ready to fry the English Muffins, mix salt and baking soda into the fermented flour mixture. I usually knead the dough on my kitchen counter. Heat a cast iron skillet over medium heat until hot, Reduce temperature slightly. Using about 1/3 cup for each English Muffin, shape dough into a ball and flatten to about 1/2 inch thick. Lay in hot pan. Cover with a lid. Fry each muffin about 6-10 minutes on each side. When finished the internal temperature should be around 200 degrees. If your muffins are browning to quickly and are not totally cooked; bake them in a preheated 350 degrees F. oven at for 5-10 minutes. 16 English Muffins.
  • **the flour amount may differ a bit depending on how thin/thick your starter is.

The little bit of honey in this recipe will be eaten by the fermenting. I use a fork to split the English Muffins. I stick a sharp fork in the middle of the muffins all around the edges. You can then pull the Muffin apart.

This how my dough looked after it was mixed with a spatula.

For this recipe I fermented the dough at room temperature for 6 hours. I then put it in the fridge for 10+ hours until I had time to make the English Muffins. I love working with cold dough as it isn’t as sticky and handles much better. You can adjust the room/cold fermenting times if you wish. Just remember that to be on-plan with THM it needs to be a minimum of 7 hours room temperature OR 72 hours cold fermenting from the time you mix the dough until it is baked. I combine the two types of fermenting to fit in my schedule as needed. For every hour of room temperature you will need 10 hour refrigerated fermenting. For example: if you allow the dough to ferment 4 hours at room temperature you will need 30 hours cold fermenting to be on plan.

English Muffins dry frying in my cast iron skillet.
These are ready to serve for breakfast with butter. One English Muffin is a serving. Using more than 1 teaspoon of butter will be a THM Crossover.
Here you can see the texture of the English Muffins.

Cinnamon Raisin Sourdough English Muffins coming to my blog soon!!

Purchase Around the Family Table Cookbook and request a free jar of starter sent with your cookbook. This cookbook had over 600 pages with 500+ recipes coming from a Mennonite mother of eight who loves to cook.

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This post has affiliated links, if you purchase items through these links, I receive a small commission but your price doesn’t change. Your purchase help support this blog, keeps new recipes coming, and assist with our move to a mission outreach of our church. I want to thank each one who has purchased through these links. It has been a blessing to us. Below are a few of my favorites listed under the affiliate store where they can be purchased.

Amazon

This flour can be bought from Amazon or order for pickup from Walmart.
Montana Wheat is the leader in White Whole Wheat flour. I buy 50 pound bags of this flour from a bulk food store.
This flour is regular whole wheat flour made from hard red winter wheat.
These spatulas are my favorite
kitchen tool to use with sourdough.
I love to use cast iron skillets. My favorite is a Griswold 1920’s era skillet I bought at my late in-laws estate sale.
Trim Healthy Mama Store

Trim Healthy Mama Store 
Mineral Salt 

English Muffins THM-E

Course Breakfast
Cuisine American
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 6 minutes
Servings 16
Author Glenda Groff

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups sourdough starter
  • 2 cups water
  • 3 1/2 cups white whole wheat flour**
  • 1 Tablespoon Honey
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 2 ½ teaspoons baking soda

Instructions

  1. Mix together starter, water, whole wheat flour, and honey. Set on countertop to ferment 7 hours or overnight. Mix salt and baking soda into the fermented flour mixture. i usually knead the dough on my kitchen counter. Heat a cast iron skillet over medium heat until hot, Reduce temperature slightly. Using about 1/3 cup for each English Muffin, shape dough into a ball and flatten to about 1/2 inch thick. Lay in hot pan. Cover with a lid. Fry each muffin about 6-10 minutes on each side. When finished the internal temperature should be around 200 degrees. If your muffins are browning to quickly and are not bake through; bake them in a preheated 350 degrees F. oven at for 5-10 minutes. 16 English Muffins **the flour amount may differ a bit depending on how thin/thick your starter is.



  2. The little bit of honey in this recipe will be eaten by the fermenting. I use a fork to split the English Muffins. I stick a sharp fork in the middle of the muffins all around the edges. You can then pull the Muffin apart.

  3. For this recipe I fermented the dough at room temperature for 6 hours. I then put it in the fridge for 10+ hours until I had time to make the English Muffins. I love working with cold dough as it isn't as sticky and handles much better. You can adjust the room/cold fermenting times if you wish. Just remember that to be on-plan with THM it needs to be a minimum of 7 hours room temperature OR 71 hours cold fermenting from when you mix it until you bake your bread. I combine the two types of fermenting to fit in my schedule as needed. For every hour of room temperature you will need 10 hour refrigerated fermenting. For example: if you allow the dough to ferment 4 hours at room temperature you will need 30 hours cold fermenting to be on plan.

You will find many more sourdough recipes in the spiral bound 600+ page Around the Family Table Cookbook. All recipes are sugar-free and label with the correct fuel. Books can be purchased using this link. You may also request a small jar of sourdough starter with the purchase of a cookbook.   Buy It Now.

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14 thoughts on “Sourdough English Muffins THM-E

  1. I’ve made these using the recipe in your cookbook and we really like them! We also like to use them as hamburger buns! First time I made them I asked my husband if he likes them? He replied, yes they’re good, where did you buy them? Huge win!!!! I had fun telling him they weren’t store bought but that I had made them! definitely a keeper recipe.

  2. I understand about the Sourdough and fermenting, but I’m confused about being able to put butter or a hamburger on them. I would think it would have to be an S bread to do that unless it’s a crossover. However for those new to the plan this would probably seem confusing. They look wonderful though.

    • My family will add butter to their English Muffins for a THM XO. I will use less than a teaspoon to stay in an E setting. If you use them as hamburger buns they will be a Crossover. Crossovers are on plan but may not help with weight loss.

  3. My dough is really runny, not knead-able. Do I just keep adding flour until it is able to be shaped.

    • You may need to add more flour if your starter was thinner. Are you just mixing the dough or are you ready to shape it?

  4. These look fantastic! I am somewhat new to sourdough baking- I need to feed my starter and leave it out for a while before I begin this recipe, correct?

    • Yes, feed your starter and let it set for 6 hours or longer. It will double in size. I feed my starter just before I got to bed and make my sourdough items first thing in the morning.

      • Do you use this same principle for making sourdough bread? So far non of my loaves have risen. Am I not using the starter at the right time?

      • What recipe are you using for your bread and how often do you feed your starter before making bread?

      • I have used your honey oat bread and your no knead bread. I feed my starter 3 times before making up my dough. I’m wondering though if I’m not feeding my starter right. I feed it this morning and at the 6 hour mark it has started to fall. It did rise very well. I’m confused at what point I start to feed it again. As it’s just starting to fall or when? And at what rise point do I make up the dough?

      • How are you feeding your starter? If you have 1 cup starter you need to feed it 1 cup four and 2/3 cup water. My starter can go 12-14 hours without deflating. MOstlikey your starter is not getting enough of food to keep it going after 6 hours.

      • Try feeding it twice the amount of flour and water one morning. See how it does after that feeding.

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